Media Statement: Crime Line scoops awards as CSI heads for South Africa

CSI President, Alex MacDonald; Divisional Commissioner: Detective Service, Lieutenant-General Vinesh Moonoo; Crime Stoppers Barbados Chairwoman, Julie Dash, Head of Crime Line and CSI Vice-President, Yusuf Abramjee; Crime Line Coordinator, Marisa Oosthuizen and Crime Stop Station Commander, Colonel Dr Attie Lamprecht.

CSI President, Alex MacDonald; Divisional Commissioner: Detective Service, Lieutenant-General Vinesh Moonoo; Crime Stoppers Barbados Chairwoman, Julie Dash, Head of Crime Line and CSI Vice-President, Yusuf Abramjee; Crime Line Coordinator, Marisa Oosthuizen and Crime Stop Station Commander, Colonel Dr Attie Lamprecht.

MEDIA STATEMENT

Thursday, 3 October 2013 
CRIME LINE SCOOPS AWARDS AS CSI HEADS FOR SOUTH AFRICA
The anonymous tip-off service, Crime Line scooped two top media awards at the 34th Annual Crime Stoppers International (CSI) Conference in Barbados this week. This as South Africa prepares to host the conference in Cape Town next year.
Head of Crime Line and CSI Vice-President, Yusuf Abramjee serves on the board of directors together with Lieutenant-General Vinesh Moonoo and Colonel Dr Attie Lamprecht from the South African Police Service (SAPS). South Africa was also represented this year by Crime Line co-ordinator, Marisa Oosthuizen.
The team represent Crime Stoppers Southern Africa (CSSA) that so far include the Crime Line and Crime Stop programmes.
CSSA secured the bid to bring the international conference to the African continent for the first time.
Crime Line received media awards in the radio and television categories for crime stoppers campaigns for communities over 3-million.
“We are honoured to end three days of intensive training on a high note with these awards.  We believe it to be a positive precursor to the 35th CSI conference that will be held in South Africa,” said Head of Crime Line, Yusuf Abramjee.
“The conference provides us with an opportunity to bring crime stoppers from around the world to our shores to share ideas and the latest trends in global crimes. Crime knows no borders and it is therefore vital for us to forge these bonds with foreign partners,” Abramjee added.
CSSA has selected Cape Town as the host city for the October 2014 prestigious conference and will open registration next month.
The conference promises to cover a variety of crime topics with expert speakers from all corners of the world.
Barbados Crime Stoppers handed the baton to the SA team at a gala dinner last night. In a video message, President Jacob Zuma said the country was looking forward to welcoming crime fighting activists to SA.
Abramjee said it was significant that the world conference was coming to SA in the same year when the country will be celebrating 20 years of freedom.
“This past week highlighted the prevalence of organised crime around the world and our need as crime stoppers to continue being a step ahead of the criminals who drive it. We aim to provide delegates with the latest trends and workable ideas and initiatives that they can take back to their communities,” said Abramjee.
“This is also an opportunity for us to showcase the various organisations and NGOs that form part of the Southern African crime fighting community. We will also be inviting our counterparts from other parts of Africa with the view of incorporating them into the CSI fold,” Abramjee added.
This past week delegates heard that tip-offs from members of the public were proving to be more effective than conventional methods to fight crime.
The establishment of dedicated anonymous tip-off lines in CSI member countries have shown significant reductions in crime. It has additionally served to strengthen and improve relations between the public, police and the media.
General Moonoo, Head of the SAPS’ Detective Service said:  “We urge communities to continue passing on tip-offs. The power is indeed in the hands of the people as this information helps us to bring criminals to book. We can’t hope to make an impact without the support of everyone – crime affects us all.”
Colonel Dr Lamprecht who runs the Crime Stop programme said SA continues to make “great strides” and tip-off volumes were increasing.
Oosthuizen said initiatives such as Drug Watch – a Crime Line partnership with the SAPS, Lead SA and the Community Police Board of Gauteng showed how effective tip-offs and police action can be. Over 27 000 arrests have been recorded since 27 June in Gauteng.
She added that over recent months especially more detailed tip-offs were also coming in about other crimes.
Members of the public can send detailed anonymous tip-offs to Crime Line’s 32211 SMS service (Costs R1), call Crime Stop on 08600 10111 or submit tip-offs online at www.crimeline.co.za.
/ENDS.
NOTE TO EDITORS: Please find a photograph attached with the following caption:

From left:  CSI President, Alex MacDonald; Divisional Commissioner: Detective Service, Lieutenant-General Vinesh Moonoo; Crime Stoppers Barbados Chairwoman, Julie Dash, Head of Crime Line and CSI Vice-President, Yusuf Abramjee; Crime Line Coordinator, Marisa Oosthuizen and Crime Stop Station Commander, Colonel Dr Attie Lamprecht. 
Media enquiries can be directed to MarisaO@primedia.co.za or Yusuf Abramjee on 082 441 4203. Kindly note the time difference between South Africa and Barbados when you place your call: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/city.html?n=46 
For the latest news, breakthroughs and alerts follow @CrimeLineZA.

Corruption Must Stop!

Shortly after 5pm on Sunday, I witnessed two men being loaded into the back of a police vehicle in Tangerine Street, Laudium, outside Pretoria.

I decided to follow the police van. Over recent months I’ve been inundated with complaints about cops taking bribes from “illegal” foreigners.

The patrol van drove for a few kilometers and stopped in 41st Avenue.

The men were released. I asked them why they were “arrested” and they said they are Malawi citizens and although they had documents, the police said they were illegally in South Africa.

The one men said he was forced to pay the cops R10. The other said he had no cash.

I immediately called the local police station commander. The men said they were happy to open a charge.

The station commander promised me he would take statements from the men “tomorrow” and take appropriate action. I hope he does. I will keep a close eye on progress.

Bribery and corruption must come to an end. A few months ago I alerted the station commander to allegations that his officers often took bribes in the Laudium area. He promised action. Clearly, the little or no measures were taken.

I have also alerted the Gauteng Police Commissioner, Lt General Mzwandile Petros, to this incident. Let’s see if he holds his police officers accountable. He has also been given full details of the foreigner who paid the bribe and the police vehicle call sign.

R10 may sound little. But this rot must stop! These people work hard to earn a living and cops continue to take their hard earned cash.

This problem appears rife in many areas. We must stand up and report the thugs!

Yusuf

We are all in this together

Gauteng Police Commissioner, Lt.General Mzwandile Petros addressed the Bedfordview 'State of the Surburb' community meeting.

Gauteng Police Commissioner, Lt.General Mzwandile Petros addressed the Bedfordview ‘State of the Surburb’ community meeting.

I attended a “State of the Suburb” community meeting in Bedfordview, Johannesburg last night, which was organised by the local Community Policing Forum (CPF).

The turnout was fantastic.

Gauteng Police Commissioner, Lt. General Mzwandile Petros and Community Safety MEC, Faith Mazibuko was there too, including representatives from the SHOUT Foundation.

The Bedfordview CPF is credited with being one of the foremost structures in South Africa. What is their secret?

General Petros also indicated it is the first CPF to invite him to engage on a community level.

Together with her team, Marina Constas, chairwoman of the Bedfordview CPF, works tirelessly with the community and local police to achieve a collective goal of preventing and curbing crime.

This community is a fantastic example of why CPFs exist in the first place and what they should do to fulfill their mandate.

There are too many examples of dysfunctional CPFs that are driven by their own personal or political agendas.

These CPFs have no relationship with the local police, nor do they listen or carry out the mandate by residents in their communities.

If this is true of your community, expose them to the provincial CPF board or if you wish to remain anonymous, contact Crime Line or Crime Stop.

marina

Marina Constas, chairwoman of the Bedfordview CPF.

The rot and corruption is not going to end if we don’t take the initiative to expose it. It is both your right and responsibility.

Bedfordview should serve as an example that we have to work together and look out for each other in our communities.

We can no longer afford to isolate ourselves behind our high walls and electrified fences.

Get to know your neighbours and take collective responsibility to achieve the type of community you want and you want your kids to grow up in.

Last night we heard from the CPF about the conditions that local police have to work in. Morale is low.

The majority of police officers were described as dedicated and Constas called on the community to support and encourage them. Read more

Clarion call to break silence on abuse of rights

Making headlines for all the wrong reasons – the SAPS has been shamed by their handling of (from left) the Oscar Pistorius case, the death of Andries Tatane at the hands of police, the Marikana massacre and the most recent case of police brutality following the death of taxi driver, Mido Macia in Daveyton.

Making headlines for all the wrong reasons – the SAPS has been shamed by their handling of (from left) the Oscar Pistorius case, the death of Andries Tatane at the hands of police, the Marikana massacre and the most recent case of police brutality following the death of taxi driver, Mido Macia in Daveyton.

“Human Rights Day (21 March) presents an opportunity, every year, to celebrate human rights, highlight a specific issue, and advocate for the full enjoyment of all human rights by everyone everywhere.”

This year, we have much to reflect upon.

The South African Police Service (SAPS) is making international headlines again following the torture and subsequent death of a Mozambican national in Daveyton.

Earlier, we had the Marikana blood-bath and the murder of Andries Tatane in the Free State. These are the high-profile cases.

But what about the many cases where ordinary citizens get abused and tortured by those in uniforms and yes, they call themselves “law enforcers”.

The SAPS has a serious problem and it requires urgent intervention at the highest level.

A call has now been made for a judicial commission of enquiry into the police to ascertain the general cause/s of the police conduct.

I don’t think there is a need for a commission. It’s simply lawlessness of the worst form and an abuse of power by SAPS members. They must be treated as criminals and the law must come down hard on them. Read more